Connect with us

Featured Review

Peterloo ★★★

A story that needs to be told and one that will be shown in classrooms for years to come

Published

on

Released: 2nd November 2018

Director: Mike Leigh

Cast: Rory Kinnear, Maxine Peake, Pearce Quigley, David Moorst, Rachel Finnegan and Tom Meredith

Reviewed By: Dion Wyn

The crown in the British film-making crown Mike Leigh is bringing the tale of one of Britain’s darkest moments. The Peterloo massacre isn’t the most taught events in the British school curriculum (it should be)! What makes this even more personal for Leigh, Peterloo happened in his neck of the woods in Manchester. This seems to be Leigh’s grandest film to date and probably his most powerful film for some time. Leigh covers the events of the 1819 Peterloo Massacre, where a peaceful pro-democracy rally at St Peter’s Field in Manchester turned into one of the bloodiest and most notorious episodes in British history. The massacre saw British government forces charge into a crowd of over 60,000 that had gathered to demand political reform and protest against rising levels of poverty. Many protesters were killed and hundreds more injured, sparking a nationwide outcry but also further government suppression.

The Peterloo Massacre was a defining moment in British democracy. Mike Leigh captures the event masterfully in only a way he can. He himself a man of the north wanted to share this tale with the world. His scope and vision along with Dick Pope’s cinematography gives Peterloo depth and power. The 154 minute runtime is used to show the build up from all perspectives and Leigh lets all walks of life share their story with the audience. Not a minute goes by where an eloquent and reformative speech is given. The grandeurs of the voices of the people roar and leave you standing to attention. Far from the Leigh formula their is no central character in the tale. We follow the journey of families, journalists, politicians and judges. You try to see the issues at bay from all angles. Leigh doesn’t necessarily want you to care about them. He wants you to remember this travesty and head its message for justice.

The visual execution is flawless but Leigh has created a very long rendition of the massacre. The speeches may seem powerful and you do hope for the best. Peterloo well test your patients. It paces itself to abruptly and you are left with very droll moments. A popular consensus is if he cut the film shorter it would of had more of an impact. Rory Kinnear’s Henry Hunt is a tepid character with only glory at mind. The voices of the common man don’t transcend with him. But he is the key point to rally the people of the North. Kinnear’s acting chops are in full force. Maxine Peake has limited screen time but she brings great emotion and pain to the piece. Peterloo will be played in school rooms for years to come. It may not be his strongest but it was a take that needed to be told.

Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Featured Review

Hurricane ★★★

Published

on

Released: 7th September 2018

Directed By: David Blair

Starring: Iwan Rheon, Milo Gibson

Reviewed By: Van Connor

What is it about a good old brim ’n’ bluster war tale that lets a bit of charm and a whole heap of cheekiness carry a movie? There’s a bit more to David Blair’s Hurricane than that, but the prominence of its cheek ’n’ charm approach is undeniable. From the moment Game of Thrones baddie Iwan Rheon struts his way through a daring escape from the Nazis, the fun’s on for this engagingly peppy and likeable true story.

 This tight and tidy hundred and ten minute war story concerns the  formation of the RAF’s 303rd squadron in the wake of their exile from Poland, and the prejudice afforded them by their British allies. “England needs all the help it can get,” Rheon’s Zumbach explains; his fellow pilots, however, are more interested in seeing them remain on the ground. Add into this mix the friendship of a group of young female war clerks – including a rather fine performance by Stefanie Martini – and the stage is set for the 303rd to prove themselves worthy of history.

It’s not entirely unlike Red Tails, with the tale of Tuskagee airmen and their treatment by American pilots sharing similar beats. As you’d expect from any war story, there’s a lively cast of supporting players bringing up the ensemble – including winning turns from Marcin Dorocinski and Krystof Hádek – and even an amusingly thankless part for the token yank, in this case a role fulfilled by Milo “son of Mel” Gibson. Rheon’s the star here, though, with swagger and charisma to match the admirably-produced (for what’s presumably a lean budget) fireworks going off in the skies above them.

Blair helms with an able hand. He’s noticeably more confident in the dramatic quotient of the tale, but is aided immeasurably by some impressive VFX work. A misjudged score by Laura Rossi proves periodically distracting, though, its tone faintly too whimsical and overblown to remain in keeping with the smaller scale sensibilities that keep Hurricane focused and confidents. It’s down to a deadpan sense of humour that Hurricane ultimately takes flight, piloted largely by the charms of Rheon and a game cast, and emerging rather an endearing World War II biopic.

Continue Reading

Featured Review

Final Score ★★

Published

on

Released: 7th September 2018

Directed By: Scott Mann

Starring: Dave Bautista, Pierce Brosnan

Reviewed By: Van Connor

If you’ve ever surfed the wasteland that is the home platform-centric side of post-nineties action – that void off to the side of where the mainstream were being distracted by Bourne movies and Michael Bay – you might have caught the faint whiff of a particularly nasty little actioner back in 2009 by the name of The Tournament. Essentially a Playstation-plotted Contest of Champions romp, the tight-and-tidy beat ‘em up made director Scott Mann a fleeting name to watch out for; fleeting only because his rather forgettable sophomore effort, Heist – which starred Robert de Niro and Dave Bautista – came and went with none of the same fanfare. Now he’s back, and (to put it in genre terms)  he’s out to make Die Hard. Unfortunately, he’s landed closer to Sudden Death.

OK, that’s unfair. Call it two-thirds of the way between Sudden Death and Under Siege 2 (remember how that was subtitled Dark Territory? That got lost to history) with all the individual plot mechanics of Die Hard. Mann reunites with Bautistae, with the WWE-star-turned-surprisingly-loveable-actor starring, of course, as Navy SEAL Uncle Mike,   who’s suffering from one of those failed missions that’s left him minus his best friend, but plus a fallen bro’s widow and daughter, who he visits in London on a regular basis. 

Uncle Mike’s  ‘niece’ is one of those fun Kim Bauer types who seem sharp as a tack in conversation, but then merrily wander into danger at the most inconvenient moments. She’s probably the wrong person for Uncle Mike to take to see West Ham play on a regular day, let alone one on which there happens to be a group of terrorists stealthily laying siege to the grounds in search of an amnesty-exiled former warlord. There’s a frankly hilarious pandemic-style simulation displaying “Projected Civil Unrest” if the terrorists get ahold of their quarry, but it mostly just plays like the whole General Radek element of Air Force One, without the sense of dread.

The intentions behind Final Score appear to have been, in their entirety: “they’re demolishing West Ham, let’s make Die Hard there”, but even there this rather overlong and startlingly uninteresting effort falls vastly far off the mark. Bautista is back on WWE Studios autopilot (we all ironically like 12 Rounds, calm down), and nobody else involved seems in the faintest bit interested in being there either. To pick far from the lowest hanging fruit, Pierce Brosnan – star of I.T. – has never been so visibly bored, and, in a movie featuring such wince-inducing penmanship as “why did my dad have to do it? Die…” it’s hard to begrudge him the right.

Meanwhile, a bevy of genre clichés litter a pretty uneventful go around the action wheel, featuring stops to pick up everything from Token Hot Girl Terrorist: Kink Edition to a panicky Argyle-like sidekick  that the script (boasting the talents of no fewer than three writers) uses entirely for the purposes of eyebrow-raising racially-driven humour. 

As far as the laugh factor goes, it’s here that Final Score actually gets one in the net, though  that depends on how alluring you find it to mock a feature this unironically silly. On that front, it’s no Geostorm, by any means – it’s not even a Gamer, certainly no Shoot ‘Em Up – but there are arguably enough mechanically-derived set pieces and plot beats in there to appease the baser wants of genre die-hards (sic). The final score’s not a great one, but if you’re game for Sudden Death all over again, it’ll scrape through for you on penalties.

Continue Reading

Featured Review

The Nightingale ★★★★

With a powerhouse performance from Aisling Franciosi, The Nightingale is a courageous and eye-opening character study

Published

on

Released: TBC

Director: Jennifer Kent

Cast: Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin, Baykali Ganambarr, Damon Herriman, Harry Greenwood, Ewen Leslie, Michael Sheasby and Charlie Shotwell

Reviewed By: Dion Wyn

Jennifer Kent’s horrifying debut The Babadook set a new benchmark for Australian filmmakers. She encapsulated horror and tackled mental health issues on the head. A true horror film for the ages. Kent is in competition with her latest The Nightingale. Not much information was available prior to the premier, but anticipation was very high! The Nightingale is set in 1825, Clare (Aisling Franciosi), a young Irish convict woman, chases a British officer (Sam Claflin) through the rugged Tasmanian wilderness, bent on revenge for a terrible act of violence he committed against her family. On the way she enlists the services of an Aboriginal tracker named Billy (Baykali Ganambarr), who is also marked by trauma from his own violence-filled past.

The Nightingale is a brutally harrowing tale from Jennifer Kent. The brutality of women and ethnicities is ruthlessly portrayed, but comradery and justice prevails in the end. Clare suffers a vast amount of abuse from Claflin’s Hawkins. Her determination for justice and resolution is truly powerful. Framed in academy ratio Clare’s journey of revenge takes us through the Tasmanian outback. The ratio enables Kent to show the claustrophobia of the journey. The use of close up shots becomes the window into our protagonists soul. Kent’s dark and gruesome tone is the key to open Clare’s inner most thoughts and actions. The doom and gloom may be prominent but there is a light heartedness through this harrowing tale.

Clare finds Billy an Aborigine to guide her through the bush. The tension between the British  and the natives are gruesomely tense during this period. The tension between them at the beginning is difficult. As their journey unfolds they grow a bond and become equals. You will see a blossoming relationship between them with a lot of humour. Humanity triumphs in this tale and Kent’s poignancy is a masterstroke. The initial incident that begins this journey is purely disturbing. The shock factor is what Kent uses to open our eyes to the brutality that women have suffered for centuries. Unfortunately we are still living in dark times of domestic violence and Kent wants us to wake up.

The use of Gaelic and Aboriginal songs convey the pain of our protagonists. It is a beautiful way to show emotion be it happiness or anger. The use of these unique languages is a breath of fresh air. Identity is very important to them and you can feel the embrace for their culture and traditions. Aisling Franciosi gives a powerhouse performance as Clare. You can feel the pain in her eyes along with her singing. The anger she conveys is raw and uncontainable. She is a major contender this awards season. Baykali Ganambarr as Billy is in the same boat as Aisling. It feels like a mirror image performance. No doubt we will see him in the mix this season too. The Nightingale is a courageous character study that will open your eyes to what is still happening today . Jennifer Kent has created a film that needs to be seen. One of the strongest and most poignant films at Venice this year.

Continue Reading

Trending