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With the 2018 edition of Berlinale about to begin, here’s 8 films you should look out for!

Information on all the films and when they are playing can be found on the Berlinale website

Karim Ainouz’s CENTRAL AIRPORT THF

CENTRAL AIRPORT THF

Dir. Karim Ainouz

CENTRAL AIRPORT THF is an intriguing portrait of what might be a little-known fact for many: this former Berlin airport now serves as an emergency refugee shelter. Brazilian director Karim Ainouz (a Berlin resident for the past several years) shows his fascination with the location, as well as his empathy for its temporary residents.

Christian Petzold’s TRANSIT

TRANSIT

Dir. Christian Petzold

TRANSIT was shot in Marseilles – a first for the award-winning German director – and the French city has never looked better. What makes this World War II story even more provocative is how Petzold films it against a modern backdrop. Franz Rogowski (Shooting Stars 2018) and Paula Beer (Frantz) smolder as star-crossed lovers.

Laura Bispuri’s DAUGHTER OF MINE

DAUGHTER OF MINE

Dir. Laura Bispuri
DAUGHTER OF MINE takes us on a bittersweet emotional journey against a beautiful Sardinian summer landscape. There’s something timeless about this modern story of a girl discovering her birth mother. Valeria Golino and Alba Rohrwacher always shine on screen, especially here, alongside a revelation like young newcomer Sara Casu. Cameo by the legendary Udo Kier.
Lev Diaz’s SEASON OF THE DEVIL

SEASON OF THE DEVIL

Dir. Lav Diaz
SEASON OF THE DEVIL is an angry rock opera about the Marcos Dictatorship. This might seem unexpected from the acclaimed Filipino director, but political passion can be felt in his own lyrics and music. After all, he’s one of the most rocknroll filmmakers on the planet. As much a departure as this film is, you can count on Lav Diaz’s signature sumptuous B&W cinematography.
Philip Groening’s MY BROTHER’S NAME IS ROBERT AND HE IS AN IDIOT

MY BROTHER’S NAME IS ROBERT AND HE IS AN IDIOT

Dir. Philip Groening
MY BROTHER’S NAME IS ROBERT AND HE IS AN IDIOT is blissfully gorgeous like its lush summer environment and the natural beauty of its twin protagonists, Robert and Elena. Groening’s 48-hour view of their overwhelming intimacy is mesmerizing and often jarring. The philosophical recitations make Groening’s own cinematography all the more dreamy.
Mani Haghighi’s PIG

PIG

Dir. Mani Haghighi
PIG is sure to be one of the most surprising films of this year’s festival. Not many comedies seduce their way into major festival competition sections. PIG’s trump card is its topicality: social media disinformation, cyber lynching. It’s also a sarcastic but fond look at film folk with an unbelievably narcissistic director who’s easy to love. The ensemble cast is a dream.
RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: async AT THE PARK AVENUE ARMORY

RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: async AT THE PARK AVENUE ARMORY

Dir. Stephen Nomura Schible
RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: async AT THE PARK AVENUE ARMORY offers an intimate ticket to a very special concert. The film manages to perfectly capture all the richness, delicacy and power of the great Sakamoto’s latest album. A perfect companion piece to Nomura Schible’s documentary RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: CODA
Martin Sulik’s THE INTERPRETER

THE INTERPRETER

Dir. Martin Sulik
THE INTERPRETER brings together two extraordinary actors: Peter Simonischek (of Toni Erdmann fame) and Jiri Menzel (director of the
Oscar-winning Closely Watched Trains). They are an odd couple on a heartbreaking mission of discovery about themselves and their countries in relation to the horrific crimes of the Holocaust.